Through the support of its membership, combined with the generous help of its conference sponsors, CAHR supports aspiring HIV/AIDS researchers from coast to coast and across the various disciplines of research. Their investigations cover all aspects of health, from cellular communications, HIV prevention, to health care economics. To learn more about CAHR funded students and how their research is contributing to improved health and care, please read the researcher profiles below.

MASTER’S STUDENTS

LAURA ROMAS| THE ANSWER LIES IN PEPTIDES

Since the global emergence of HIV, a particular subset of people has caught the interest of the HIV research community. It appears that some people, despite repeated exposure to HIV, have never become infected. Many studies have looked into the differences between these individuals and the rest of the population, showing differences in mucosal immune responses in cervical, salivary and foreskin secretions. However, little work has looked at mucosal immune differences in the rectum of MSM (men who have sex with men). Read more…

KYLE RUNECKLES| THE ABORIGINAL PEOPLE’S SURVEY

Kyle Runeckles, MSc student at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, has a wealth of information on his hands. As a follow-up to the Long form National Census survey of 2001 and 2006, the Aboriginal Peoples Survey gathered information from First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit from across Canada. Weighted to proportionally represent all off reserve Aboriginal People in Canada, the survey asked questions regarding ancestry, identity, language, perceived health status, mobility and transportation among others. Read more…

XIAOMEI KUANG | ANTI-LATENCY AGENTS AND T CELL EPITOPES

Xiaomei (Tallie) Kuang, a Masters student from Simon Fraser University, is exploring how to eliminate a “sleeping virus”. In a person living with HIV, highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) is able to keep the level of virus in the body to a minimum. However, complete removal of HIV has not been possible because of latent reservoirs that cannot be targeted with HAART. Read more…

FARSHAD AZIMI | MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS

As a student at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences in Iran, Farshad Azimi decided he wanted to contribute to the field of basic sciences. “My medical training made me realize that I wanted to complement my practical knowledge of medicine through contributions to the process of scientific discovery as a researcher with a clinical focus.” Read more…

TYLER TULLOCH | CHILDHOOD BULLYING AND ITS AFTERMATH

In recent years, bullying has made headlines with some tragic examples of how devastating teasing can be for a child or teen. Increased awareness has led to anti-bullying messages and campaigns in an effort to reduce bullying in schools and provide support for those who may be victims of it. Tyler Tulloch, now a PhD student at Ryerson suggests that the effects of bullying may extend well beyond adolescence, into adult years. With the support of a CIHR/CAHR Master’s Award, Tyler’s research looked at how a history of being teased, particularly for non-conforming gender presentation and social activity, affected adult high-risk sexual activity. Read more…

DEANNA ZANET | APPLES TO AGING

The road to HIV research is winding, many of the students that CAHR has supported have come into HIV research from various other disciplines and interests. DeAnna Zanet, currently completing her MSc at UBC, studied postharvest pathogens of apples during undergrad but became interested in HIV research in her fourth year. Read more…

SHAMARA BAIDOOBONSO

Shamara is a true scientist at heart. Her natural inquisitiveness and willingness to push aside any assumptions has served her well as she has transitioned from a career in basic sciences to social epidemiology. Read more…

LINDSAY ABOUD | GOOD NEWS TRUMPS BAD

It is a bit like the old joke – I have some bad news and some good news. Read more…

COURTNEY BELL | BASIC SCIENCE, AS PRACTICED IN THE COMMUNITY

Think “basic science” and what comes to mind? Labs, white coats, painstaking analysis of extremely small cellular samples. For Courtney Bell, however, conducting basic science has immersed her firmly in the community – and it’s a place she likes to be. Read more…

ERIC MARTIN | BRINGING THE POWER OF COMPUTING TO BIOLOGY

As those who study it know all too well, HIV is a nasty virus that is very adaptable – so adaptable it can mutate differently in every individual to overcome his or her own unique immune system. That makes vaccine development difficult, to say the least. Read more…

CAHR/CIHR DOCTORAL SCHOLARSHIPS IN HIV RESEARCH

TYLER BROWN | STICKS AND STONES

The saying goes ‘names can never hurt you’; but they just might. The insults and slurs so often thrown around amongst young men, directed both at heterosexual or gay men, may ultimately re-assert rigid ideas of masculinity and ultimately affect how (or whether) they protect themselves, and their sexual partner(s) from HIV. Read more…

ALLISON CARTER | LIVING AND LOVING WITH HIV

When we last spoke with Allison Carter for our Community Researcher Biographies, she was working with CHIWOS as provincial coordinator for British Columbia. CHIWOS is Canada’s largest community-based longitudinal cohort study, with 1,425 women living with HIV enrolled across BC, Ontario, and Quebec, and expansion now underway to Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Today, she’s working towards a PhD at Simon Fraser University, under the supervision of Dr. Angela Kaida, with support from a CAHR/CIHR Doctoral Research Award. Read more…

DEREK CLOUTHIER | SUSTAINING THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

“Since my middle school years, I’ve wanted to be a scientist” says Derek Clouthier, recipient of a CAHR/CIHR Doctoral award in Basic Sciences. It was during his undergraduate studies in Biochemistry that Derek realized it was the human immune system and how it responded to viral infections that really intrigued him. Read more…

RODNEY KNIGHT | TAKING AN ETHICAL LENS TO HIV SCREENING

Most people are familiar with clinical ethics, which have to do with individual interactions, usually between a health-care professional and a patient. Read more…

KATHERINE MULDOON | AT THE INTERSECTION OF VIOLENCE AND HIV RISK

Imagine that staple of primary education, a Venn diagram. In one circle is the issue of post-conflict violence – what happens after a long war ends. In the other circle are young sex workers and their risk for HIV. Now imagine the area where those circles overlap. Read more…

BRENDAN OSBORNE | DOING WHAT HE LOVES BEST

Brendan Osborne was actively engaged in the business end of research, working with universities and Networks of Centres of Excellence to help researchers take their discoveries to the marketplace. Read more…

PETER QUASHIE | PURSUING A LIFELONG DREAM

Having spent his school years in Botswana, Peter Quashie was familiar with the toll AIDS was taking in the community around him. Read more…